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Tuesday, January 8

  1. page Augmented & Virtual Realities edited ... virtual worlds can adapt and grow to meet learners' goals and needs. Students as avatars can …
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    virtual worlds can adapt and grow to meet learners' goals and needs.
    Students as avatars can select the appropriate level, can choose what problem they solve, and can save and restart a game when they want. In addition, students can learn in virtual environments that mimic real environments, and thus can be immersed in the learning to a higher degree. They can personally experience choices and situations, and they can therefore connect with the situation at a deeper level.
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    traditional learning. This blogfrom Accredited Online Colleges describes ways in which avatars are already being used in online learning environments in higher education, including for teaching assistants and coaches. Avatars most
    Greeting, playing, signalling group affiliation, conveying opinions or feelings, creating closeness and dealing with conflict
    Creating a strong sense of presence or ‘being there’ with others
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    10:41 pm

Saturday, September 15

Sunday, December 11

  1. page The Flat Classroom edited ... students creating videos that are judged by other educations from around the world experienci…
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    students creating videos that are judged by other educations from around the world
    experiencing a student summit via a virtual classroom in order to share and reflect at the end of the project
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    smaller scale opportuntiesopportunities and more
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    their classroom.
    The Flat Classroom Project celebrated their fifth birthday on November 22, 2011, and announced the launching of Flat Classroom® Project Databank on January 27, 2012, and the publication of Davis' first co-authored book, **Flattening Classrooms, Engaging Minds: Move to Global Collaboration One Step at a Time** which will also be available next year. It will be in full color as an e-book with QR codes and Twitter tags. Those who decide to delve into this wonderful project will not be disappointed. The excitement and dedication everyone involved has as they share their research and connections is evident. They are continuously growing with currently over 1,000 participants and various sponsors and partners who believe in their vision.

    {flat_classroom}
    Please visit Atomic Learning for the clips, Understanding the term Flat Classroom and Flattening your classroom.
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    4:11 pm
  2. page Project-Based Learning edited ... Hear from three teachings about how they used PBL to reconstruct their classroom time. The vi…
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    Hear from three teachings about how they used PBL to reconstruct their classroom time.
    The video below shares what experts think of PBL.
    For further insight regarding the steps of PBL and/or to get a glimpse of the overall concept, read the information below from PBL.org.
    Start with the Essential Question
    The teacher should keep the essential question simple and appropriate for the age group in order for success to be experienced by all students. The following points provide an overview of where to begin:
    Engaging question - it is open ended with more than one answer or solution
    Investigate - delve into a real-world topic and allow what is happening in the classroom and/or in the community as a guide
    Direct impact - provide questions pertaining to issues that are relevant for the students
    Design a Plan for the Project
    After the essential question is in place, the teacher needs to:
    Identify the content standards
    Involve the students in planning
    Select activities that support the question and utilize the curriculum effectively
    Make it as interdisciplinary as possible
    Be knowledgeable regarding the available materials and resources that students can use
    Be eager and supportive in order to guide students as the project gets more involved
    Create a Schedule
    Consider these issues, as outlined in the article, when creating a schedule:
    How much time will be allowed for completing the project?
    Will the work be completed during the whole school day or during schedule blocks of various times?
    How many days will be schedule for the completion of the project?
    After the schedule is created, provide detailed instructions that will enable the success of all students. Time limits are critical so ensure that all students fully understand them. Benchmarks, evaluating performance, are essential as the students are given specific direction for time management. Students will need to be taught how to schedule their tasks followed by being reminded of the timeline. They will also need to set their own deadlines to keep them on task.
    For more insight on planning, please visit Andrew Miller's post How to Build a Calendar for Project-Based Learning.
    Monitor the Students and the Progress of the Project
    Students will need to take charge of their learning and be responsible for their work. Teachers can support these actions by making sure the learning environment is engaging so students will be eager and excited to learn. Students will need to be taught how to successfully work together so if students are not use to this in the classroom, they can be given opportunities to partner with a classmate before hand. This will enable some practice and guidance for larger groups in order for students to be comfortable with working outside of the norm of being by themselves. By designating pertinent roles for groups, students will understand the importance of the roles in order to comprehend why they will have primary roles along with other roles pertaining to each individual member as part of the team. Students will need to be reminded they will have to remain involved throughout the entire process and they will be given proper guidance and resources. Assessment is always a meaningful component that should not be taken lightly as the teacher and as the student so the teacher should create team and project rubrics for evaluating the project.
    Assess the Outcome
    By assessing the outcome, students and teachers will receive valuable information in regards to diagnostic feedback that will help to set standards. The progress that is witnessed can be related to others and given to students through feedback. The overall outcomes will enable the teacher to design instruction for more effective teaching. Assessment is a critical component of learning so it is also essential to give students the opportunity to conduct self-assessments. At times, student-teacher conferences may be necessary in order to allow students to explain and justify their reasoning. Be sure to visit, Edutopia.org PBL's blogger Suzie Boss post on culminating events in How to End Projects on a High Note.
    Evaluate the Experience
    It is always beneficial to evaluate the experience from both a teacher and student perspective. Self-evaluation allows everyone to share their feelings and experiences in order to decide what worked and/or what may not have worked. Changes are inevitable because there will always be ways to improve thus guiding ideas that may lead to new projects.
    PBL Lends Itself to Authentic Assessment
    Authentic assessment and evaluation enables a child's progress and development to be documented via multiple assessment opportunities. The child can demonstrate his or her capabilities by working independently and also applying research skills. A sense of teamwork is created while the child is working collaboratively within a group which allows the teacher to see different sides of the student. The teacher can also easily communicate with the students and share constructive criticism when needed.
    Designing an Interactive Course Site
    Visit http://edtech.boisestate.edu/krice/PBL/developing_an_interactive_course.htm to read a paper by Kerry Rice, instructor and web developer at Boise State University, Department of Educational Technology. She shares how she developed an interactive course site for project based learning. The following two diagrams provide a glimpse of her work. {figure_1}
    {figure_1}
    {figure_2}
    The following documents in quick view format provide guidance for getting started:
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    4:08 pm
  3. page Partnerships & Collaboration edited ... As nations begin to see what works and what does not work in public education, they are openin…
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    As nations begin to see what works and what does not work in public education, they are opening up and starting to emulate what others are doing due to their success. There are several resources for getting started on a smaller scale such as Global Virtual Classrooms (GVC) and Global Dreamers. Global Virtual Classroom provides free, online educational activities and resources in order to support the goals of governments and educators world-wide. Their vision is to empower, enable and connect students around the world using Internet technology by providing opportunities to develop essential 21st century skills such as cross-cultural communication, collaboration through teamwork, information technology and web design. They also sponsor a web contest, which is a great funding opportunity, for primary and secondary schools. The application is due in late September and the program runs from October to March.
    GVC provides the following lists of tips, also known as net-etiquette, or “netiquette” for teachers and students:
    Teacher Collaborating Tips
    Motivating Students
    In order to motivate students for successful collaboration, they need to feel that their new friends are real, so mounting clocks that show the local time in the partner schools and marking the actual locations on a world map would be the initial step. They can also choose pen pals that they will email from the other schools. By saving all of the material received from partner schools, a nice scrapbook can be created along with bulletin boards. Another initial step would be to write a class letter to the partner schools and send it via email. The class can actually collaborate while writing the letter via Google docs, a free web-based and data storage service from Google. Ongoing communication is essential and there are various resources that will enable real-time communication amongst everyone involved such as chat, instant messaging or video conferencing. The grading of any assignment related to the classroom connections needs to be consistent with any other graded assignments and of course, reward students for creativity, improvement, leadership skills, artistic talent, and hard work.

    GVS also shares the following ideas for school support:
    Consult. Inform the administrators about the needs of the project and stay educated and up-to-date on the schools' requirements and policies before hand. {tream_collaborating} Yahoo images
    ...
    Community Support
    Getting support from the community may seem like a daunting task initially, but once the project and its mission is advertised, parents may be the first to get involved. They may even offer their skills and expertise for various tasks. Selecting mentors and/or coaches will enable more collaboration, support, and innovative ideas to surface. Advertising too much is never an issue so use the local television, newspaper and/or school newsletter, and present at parent-teacher associate or group meetings. It is also a good idea t reach out and ask co-worker and other community members to offer constructive criticism.
    Fitting GVC into your Lessons
    Time is always an issue when trying to add more engagement to the classroom so it is beneficial to integrate project topics with units and/or themes which will provide more retainment of skills and concepts. Always think big and students will provide amazement with their creativity, also enabling collaboration via the range of topics that can be be merged. How can a busy schedule still allow for GVC? Well, students can visit libraries and consult each other outside of class time which should be saved for essential communication. Always inform them of the deadlines and send out reminders when needed along with even starting a GVC club.
    Student Collaborating Tips
    The following rules will enable students to become great partners and communicate openly and frequently:
    Be sensitive
    Avoid misunderstandings
    Be responsible
    Visit the website for specific details.

    {Collaborating-Group.jpg} Yahoo images
    The following online communities and resources are beneficial for those interested in starting a global connection in their classroom:
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    4:06 pm

Saturday, December 10

  1. page Partnerships & Collaboration edited ... 6. Create Culture of Sharing and Collaboration: Always be open to share 7. Mutual Respect is …
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    6. Create Culture of Sharing and Collaboration: Always be open to share
    7. Mutual Respect is Key: Maintain mutual respect even in disagreements
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    Chad Barnett statedstates it best,
    Dr. Douglas Lambert uses the partnership model to define its value in business but it relates to education as well.
    {modelbig.jpg}
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    4:49 pm
  2. page References edited ... UDL Center (Creator). The UDL Guidelines [Video]. 2010, March 17). Retrieved from http://www.y…
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    UDL Center (Creator). The UDL Guidelines [Video]. 2010, March 17). Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfsx3DGpv5o
    Universal Design for Learning. Found at http://www.cast.org/udl/
    University of Pittsburgh School of Education. (2011). Collaborations and Partnerships. Retrieved from www.education.pitt.edu
    Wagner, M.D. (2007, August) Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games as Constructivist Learning Environments: A Delphi Study. Proposal Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Technology. Walden University. p. 64
    What is pbl? (nd). Buck Institute for Education. Retrieved November 8, 2011 from http://www.bie/org/about/what_is_pbl/
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    4:47 pm
  3. page Partnerships & Collaboration edited ... 6. Create Culture of Sharing and Collaboration: Always be open to share 7. Mutual Respect is …
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    6. Create Culture of Sharing and Collaboration: Always be open to share
    7. Mutual Respect is Key: Maintain mutual respect even in disagreements
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    their journey. Chad Barnett stated it best, "Collaborating and sharing ideas....having ideas cultivated...through critical thinking-your voice becomes stronger when your most important principles are supported and challenged."
    Dr. Douglas Lambert uses the partnership model to define its value in business but it relates to education as well.
    {modelbig.jpg}
    (view changes)
    4:44 pm
  4. page References edited ... Barseghian, T. (2011, February 4). Three Trends That Will Shape the Future of Curriculum. Mind…
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    Barseghian, T. (2011, February 4). Three Trends That Will Shape the Future of Curriculum. Mind/Shift: How we will learn. Retrieved from
    http://mindshift.kqed.org/2011/02/three-trends-that-will-shape-the-future-of-curriculum/
    Berry, Barnett. (2011, March). Techerpreneurs: A More Powerful Vision for the Teaching Profession. Retrieved from
    www.kappanmagazine.org/content/92/6/28.short

    Black, P. and Wiliam, D. (1998, November 11). Inside the black box: Raising standards through classroom assessment. Phi Delta Kappan International. Retrieved online at http://www.pdkintl.org/kappan/kbla9810.htm
    Blascovich J., and Bailenson, J. (2011). Infinite Reality: Avatars, Eternal Life, New Worlds, and the Dawn of the Virtual Revolution. New York: HarperCollins Publishers. Accessed online at
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    4:37 pm
  5. page References edited ... http://youtu.be/LMCZvGesRz8 The Scholastic Channel [Video file]. (2010, February 18). Retriev…
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    http://youtu.be/LMCZvGesRz8
    The Scholastic Channel [Video file]. (2010, February 18). Retrieved from http://youtu.be/c6jZjpvIio4
    Thomas, John. (2000, March). A Review of Research on Project-Based Learning. Retrieved from
    **//http://www.bie.org/research/study/review_of_project_based_learning_2000//**

    Turkle, Sherry. (1995). Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet. New York: Simon & Schuster. Summary found online at
    http://www.transparencynow.com/turkle.htm
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    4:32 pm

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